Hens for Sale
Hens for Sale
Pinterest
Twitter
google plus
facebook
Hens for Sale
OPENING HOURS

Monday  10am - 4pm
Tuesday 10am - 4pm
WEDNESDAY CLOSED
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday    10am - 4pm
Saturday 10am - 4pm
Sunday 10am - 4pm








Tel: 01388 731131
Email: info@durhamhens.co.uk 
Tow Law, Co. Durham,
DL13 4BN  



Online sales
®

Vine House                 Tel:   01388 731131
Nr. Tow Law                Mob: 07763929686
Bishop Auckland        Email: info@durhamhens.co.uk
Co. Durham                 
DL13 4BN




Quality Hens and Poultry Supplies
Open Bank Holiday Weekend Sat, Sun, Mon 10 - 4
Vine House                 Tel:   01388 731131
Nr. Tow Law                Mob: 07763929686
Bishop Auckland        Email: info@durhamhens.co.uk
Co. Durham                 
DL13 4BN




Poultry & Eggs
Services
Help & Advice
Poultry & Eggs
Services
Help & Advice
Keeping Chickens

Hens for Sale - Good Egg Layers & Pets



Keeping Chickens - A Beginner's Guide



Preparing for your hens

Free-range or Run: Whether you keep your hens free-range, where they sleep in a coop and roam freely during the day, or contained within a run will depend on your circumstances. Free-range is great if you have the space but hens can be happy in a run, providing they are not overcrowded, and they will also be safer from predators.

Hen Houses:
There is a fantastic range of hen houses available. Some have integral runs, others have detachable runs and some are designed to stand inside an enclosure or be used for free-ranging birds. Wood is the traditional material but now there are modern plastic ones that provide a practical alternative. These are easy to clean, long-lasting and do not need protecting from the weather. Please see the following page for more details: http://www.durham-hens-poultry-supplies.co.uk/hen-houses-15-c.asp

Bedding:
We use wood shavings. They are more expensive than straw but last longer. Bedding should be changed regularly (every 1 or 2 weeks). We mix Smite powder into fresh bedding to keep the coop free of insects. Wood shavings, straw and hay are available in our shop.

Choosing your hens:
Hens for laying eggs are usually purchased at point of lay (16-24 weeks old). Most hens start to lay between 20-26 weeks but this depends on the breed, e.g. some pure breeds such as Buff Orpingtons will not lay until at least 30 weeks of age. Buying at point of lay means you have the hen for its full laying life and hens do lay most eggs in their first year. It is worth buying good quality, young hens that will lay well. It can be frustrating to feed and look after older hens when they do give you eggs in return (you get what you pay for!). It is worth noting that some hens, such as ex-battery hens, find it difficult to adapt to a living in a mixed flock if they have not seen other types of hens early in their lives. Our hens are kept in sheds with other breeds so tend to mix well. Please see our 'Hen Breed' pages for details of the breeds we stock.

Collecting your hens: You're welcome to collect your hens during opening hours and Durham Hens can provide cardboard boxes to transport them home. We also sell plastic pet carriers if you'd prefer a reusable carrier. Hens' wings can be clipped to prevent flying; this does not cause the hen any pain or distress. If you'd like your hens' wings to be clipped, we will do this free of charge. Please ask us when you arrive. Keep the car cool while travelling. Hens do not need food or water while travelling even if you have a long journey.

Caring for your hens

Feeding: Hens should always have access to layers pellets or mash at all times; they will not overeat these. Please note that hens are healthier and eggs are more prolific and tastier if you use a good quality feed. We recommend Garvo layers pellets or layers mash. Each hen needs approximately 1kg of food per week. Do not limit their food or egg production will fall. In the summer hens do not require any other food, although free-range hens will forage and small amounts of mixed corn or wheat can be fed as a treat. In the winter layers pellets/mash should be combined roughly 4:1 with mixed corn or wheat, both of which are higher in calories. The extra calories are needed to keep hens warm and therefore help egg production during cold spells. Too much however can make your hens fat and prevent them from laying! Fresh water should be available at all times - allow at least 1/3L per hen each day. Mixed poultry grit should be given to hens in runs. It comprises small pieces of flint that aid digestion and broken oyster shells which provide extra calcium. A separate container should be used for grit or it can be scattered on the ground when dry. We have layers pellets, layers mash, wheat, mixed corn and mixed grit available for sale.

Durham Hen House
Eglo Hen House
wooden coop
Making your own hen house: You can make your own coop if you're handy. The house must have a perch for the hens to roost on at night, a nest box for laying eggs and preferably a little extra space for a feeder. Current guidelines:
  • floor space of the coop - at least one square foot per hen (30.5cm)
  • minimum of 6 inches (15cm) of perch per hen
  • one nest box is suitable for up to 8 hens
The run should either be covered or the fences should be about 5 foot high (1.5m) to stop hens escaping.

Bedding:
We use wood shavings. They are more expensive than straw but last longer. Bedding should be changed regularly (every 1 or 2 weeks). We mix Smite powder into fresh bedding to keep the coop free of insects. Wood shavings, straw and hay are available in our shop.

Choosing your hens:
Hens for laying eggs are usually purchased at point of lay (16-24 weeks old). Most hens start to lay between 20-26 weeks but this depends on the breed, e.g. some pure breeds such as Buff Orpingtons will not lay until at least 30 weeks of age. Buying at point of lay means you have the hen for its full laying life and hens do lay most eggs in their first year. It is worth buying good quality, young hens that will lay well. It can be frustrating to feed and look after older hens when they do give you eggs in return (you get what you pay for!). It is worth noting that some hens, such as ex-battery hens, find it difficult to adapt to a living in a mixed flock if they have not seen other types of hens early in their lives. Our hens are kept in sheds with other breeds so tend to mix well. Please see our 'Hen Breed' pages for details of the breeds we stock.

Collecting your hens: You're welcome to collect your hens during opening hours and Durham Hens can provide cardboard boxes to transport them home. We also sell plastic pet carriers if you'd prefer a reusable carrier. Hens' wings can be clipped to prevent flying; this does not cause the hen any pain or distress. If you'd like your hens' wings to be clipped, we will do this free of charge. Please ask us when you arrive. Keep the car cool while travelling. Hens do not need food or water while travelling even if you have a long journey.

Feeding: Hens should always have access to layers pellets or mash at all times; they will not overeat these. Please note that hens are healthier and eggs are more prolific and tastier if you use a good quality feed. We recommend Garvo layers pellets or layers mash. Each hen needs approximately 1kg of food per week. Do not limit their food or egg production will fall. In the summer hens do not require any other food, although free-range hens will forage and small amounts of mixed corn or wheat can be fed as a treat. In the winter layers pellets/mash should be combined roughly 4:1 with mixed corn or wheat, both of which are higher in calories. The extra calories are needed to keep hens warm and therefore help egg production during cold spells. Too much however can make your hens fat and prevent them from laying! Fresh water should be available at all times - allow at least 1/3L per hen each day. Mixed poultry grit should be given to hens in runs. It comprises small pieces of flint that aid digestion and broken oyster shells which provide extra calcium. A separate container should be used for grit or it can be scattered on the ground when dry. We have layers pellets, layers mash, wheat, mixed corn and mixed grit available for sale.








 

Choosing your hens: Hens for laying eggs are usually purchased at point of lay (16-24 weeks old). Most hens start to lay between 20-26 weeks but this depends on the breed, e.g. some pure breeds such as Buff Orpingtons will not lay until at least 30 weeks of age. Buying at point of lay means you have the hen for its full laying life and hens do lay most eggs in their first year. It is worth buying good quality, young hens that will lay well. It can be frustrating to feed and look after older hens when they do give you eggs in return (you get what you pay for!). It is worth noting that some hens, such as ex-battery hens, find it difficult to adapt to a living in a mixed flock if they have not seen other types of hens early in their lives. Our hens are kept in sheds with other breeds so tend to mix well. Please see our 'Hen Breed' pages for details of the breeds we stock.
Pecking order: Hens will have minor scuffles to sort out the pecking order. Calm'n'Thrive can help to reduce stress.  If feather pecking becomes a problem or they draw blood, remove the victim for a few days and either apply anti-pecking spray to prevent pecking or gentian violet spray to wounds.

Watch your new birds carefully to make sure that they are all eating. If a hen appears weak and lethargic, sits in a corner with feathers fluffed up or refuses to leave the coop, she is probably being bullied off the food.

Caring for your hens


Collecting your hens:
You're welcome to collect your hens during opening hours and Durham Hens can provide cardboard boxes to transport them home. We also sell plastic pet carriers if you'd prefer a reusable carrier. Hens' wings can be clipped to prevent flying; this does not cause the hen any pain or distress. If you'd like your hens' wings to be clipped, we will do this free of charge. Please ask us when you arrive. Keep the car cool while travelling. Hens do not need food or water while travelling even if you have a long journey.


Feeding: Hens should always have access to layers pellets or mash at all times; they will not overeat these. Please note that hens are healthier and eggs are more prolific and tastier if you use a good quality feed. We recommend Garvo layers pellets or layers mash. Each hen needs approximately 1kg of food per week. Do not limit their food or egg production will fall. In the summer hens do not require any other food, although free-range hens will forage and small amounts of mixed corn or wheat can be fed as a treat. In the winter layers pellets/mash should be combined roughly 4:1 with mixed corn or wheat, both of which are higher in calories. The extra calories are needed to keep hens warm and therefore help egg production during cold spells. Too much however can make your hens fat and prevent them from laying! Fresh water should be available at all times - allow at least 1/3L per hen each day. Mixed poultry grit should be given to hens in runs. It comprises small pieces of flint that aid digestion and broken oyster shells which provide extra calcium. A separate container should be used for grit or it can be scattered on the ground when dry. We have layers pellets, layers mash, wheat, mixed corn and mixed grit available for sale.






Cleaning the coop: The coop should be cleaned thoroughly several times a year (more often if you have red mite). We use Poultry Shield, an effective cleaner designed for poultry sheds. It kills all organic matter including red mite but is safe for your hens. We sell it in our shop and online. Most household bleaches and cleaners are not suitable.


General Health:
Vaccinations: Our hens have been vaccinated against most serious poultry diseases and these vaccines give life-time cover.
Click here for details.
Worming: Hens need to be wormed regularly. Natural products to prevent worms include Diatom powder or Verm-X pellets. Flubenvet should be used for hens suffering from worms.
Fleas & Lice: To treat and prevent fleas and lice, apply Diatom powder to dust baths or directly onto the hens (especially under wings and around bottoms).
Moult: Hens moult at regular intervals (12-18months). They may look scruffy as they lose their old feathers and grow new ones. Most hens will stop laying temporarily through their moult. This is a natural process that can be accelerated by adding Poultry Spice to their food.
We supply an excellent range of health products
 in our shop and online.
Durham Hens stock a good selection of quality plastic and galvanised drinkers and feeders in our shop and online. To see our full range, please click DRINKERS or FEEDERS.

Our feeders are kept indoors so the food stays dry and vermin cannot eat it at night. Drinkers can be indoors or outdoors, although there is less danger of other animals/birds sharing and spreading disease if it is kept indoors.








Poultry Drinkers
Cleaning the coop: The coop should be cleaned thoroughly about four times a year (more often if you have red mite). We use Poultry Shield, an effective cleaner designed for poultry sheds. It kills all organic matter including red mite but is safe for your hens. We sell it in our shop and online. Most household bleaches and cleaners are not suitable.

General Health:
Vaccinations: Our hens have been vaccinated against most serious poultry diseases and these vaccines give life-time cover. Click here for details.
Worming:
Hens need to be wormed regularly. Natural products to prevent worms include Smite powder or Verm-X pellets. Flubenvet should be used for hens suffering from worms.
Fleas & Lice:
To treat and prevent fleas and lice, apply Smite powder to dust baths or directly onto the hens (especially under wings and around bottoms).
Moult:
Hens moult annually. They may look scruffy as they lose their old feathers and grow new ones. Most hens will stop laying temporarily through their moult. This is a natural process that can be accelerated by adding Poultry Spice to their food.
Other:
If you are concerned about a hen please see our 'Hen Health' page or visit your vet as many conditions can be easily treated if they are diagnosed early.

Hens in Winter:
Hens are outdoor animals and, unless you have exotic breeds, they are pretty hardy.
Food:
If you keep them on the same rations as in summer, they'll use all the calorie intake to keep warm - hence the myth that hens won't lay in winter! To ensure you have a winter supply of eggs, you should add about a fifth mixed corn, wheat or maize to their normal layers pellets/mash. Some people prefer to give layers mash in the winter as it can be mixed with warm water to make a porridge-type mix (at about body temperature). Poultry spice is a traditional winter food supplement.
Water:
When it's very cold always check their water in case it's frozen. Tonic can be added to help fight off winter bugs.
Coop:
Extra bedding will help to insulate the hens from the ground. Keep it as dry as possible. We use BioDri powder with wood shavings in winter (BioDri is a natural sanitiser and drying agent). If you have a coop with a metal tray use layers of newspaper for insulation - metal gets very cold in winter. Never close the vents - warm damp air harbours germs and hens are prone to chest problems in these conditions. Cold dry air is healthier.
Run:
Try to keep it dry. Run covers are useful. Hens don't like snow on the ground. Add straw and they'll come out and have a scratch around - if they stay active they'll stay warmer.

Pecking order
: Hens will have minor scuffles to sort out the pecking order. If feather pecking becomes a problem or they draw blood, remove the victim for a few days and either apply to prevent pecking or gentian violet spray to wounds. Watch your new birds carefully to make sure that they are all eating. If a hen appears weak and lethargic, sits in a corner with feathers fluffed up or refuses to leave the coop, she is probably being bullied off the food.

Predators:
Always lock your hens safely in their coop overnight to protect them from predators: foxes, badgers, stoats and dogs can kill hens.

Introducing new hens to your flock:
It is best to introduce new hens to your coop on an evening after your existing hens have roosted for the night. Hens are more docile at this time. Watch the hens carefully when you let them out the next day. There is always a little bullying as they sort out the pecking order but this should soon settle down. Ensure your new hens are getting plenty of food as the existing flock often prevent them from eating (see pecking order above). Lack of food reduces their immune system, causes weakness and if prolonged they will starve!

If you would like a more in depth introduction to starting with chickens, we run courses at Durham Hens.




Copyright Durham Hens Limited
VAT Registration Number 995021312,  Company Number 07703899,  Directors of Durham Hens Limited: A.J.Manchester, M.R.Manchester
.




Other problems
: If you are concerned about a hen please see our 'Hen Health' page or visit your vet as many conditions can be easily treated if they are diagnosed early.

Predators:
Always lock your hens safely in their coop overnight to protect them from predators: foxes, badgers, stoats and dogs can kill hens.

Introducing new hens to your flock:
It is best to introduce new hens to your coop on an evening after your existing hens have roosted for the night. Hens are more docile at this time. Watch the hens carefully when you let them out the next day. There is always a little bullying as they sort out the pecking order but this should soon settle down. Calm'n'Thrive can help to reduce stress. Ensure your new hens are getting plenty of food as the existing flock often prevent them from eating (see pecking order above). Lack of food reduces their immune system, causes weakness and if prolonged they will starve!

If you would like a more in depth introduction to starting with chickens, we run short courses at Durham Hens.


Cleaning the coop: The coop should be cleaned thoroughly several times a year (more often if you have red mite). We use Poultry Shield, an effective cleaner designed for poultry sheds. It kills all organic matter including red mite but is safe for your hens. We sell it in our shop and online. Most household bleaches and cleaners are not suitable.


General Health:
Vaccinations: Our hens have been vaccinated against most serious poultry diseases and these vaccines give life-time cover.
Click here for details.
Worming: Hens need to be wormed regularly. Natural products to prevent worms include Diatom powder or Verm-X pellets. Flubenvet should be used for hens suffering from worms.
Fleas & Lice: To treat and prevent fleas and lice, apply Diatom powder to dust baths or directly onto the hens (especially under wings and around bottoms).
Moult: Hens moult at regular intervals (12-18months). They may look scruffy as they lose their old feathers and grow new ones. Most hens will stop laying temporarily through their moult. This is a natural process that can be accelerated by adding Poultry Spice to their food.
Copyright Durham Hens Limited
VAT Registration Number 995021312,  Company Number 07703899
Directors: A.J.Manchester, M.R.Manchester.